Venice – Biennale di Arte 2015: Argentinian Pavilion

L1170946 (Large)Artist: Juan Carlos DistéfanoL1170943 (Large) L1170940 (Large)

Biennale di Venezia, Italy till November 22, 2015

Venice – Biennale di Arte 2015: Georg Baselitz

L1170933 (Large)One of the significant styles which uses Georg Baselitz in his art are the figures with the head upside down.L1170934 (Large)Biennale di Venezia, Italy till November 22, 2015

Venice – Biennale di Arte 2015: Arsenale II

Biennale di Venezia, Italy till November 22, 2015

Venice – Biennale di Arte 2015: British Pavilion

L1170985 (Large)„Humour is about negotiating the contradictions thrown up by convention. To a certain extent humour and seriousness are interchangeable. Otherwise it wouldn’t be funny. Or devastating.“
Sarah LucasL1170988 (Large)Sarah Lucas is representing Britain in the Giardini at the 56th Venice International Art Biennale 2015 with her major solo exhibition, I SCREAM DADDIO, in the British Pavilion.

Sarah Lucas’s works for the British Pavilion reprise and reinvent the themes that have come to define her powerfully irreverent art – gender, death, sex, and the innuendo residing in everyday objects. Throughout this latest group of works, the body – sexual, comedic, majestic – remains a crucial point of return, while Lucas’s work continues to confront big themes with a distinctive wit.L1170994 (Large) L1170995 (Large) L1170993 (Large) L1170992 (Large) L1170991 (Large) L1170989 (Large) L1170986 (Large)Biennale di Venezia, Italy till November 22, 2015

Venice – Biennale di Arte 2015: Ursula von Rydingsvard

L1170886 (Large)During the next weeks I will introduce to you some pieces of art which I discoverd at my visit of the Venice Art Biennale in June 2015.

Let’s start with Ursula von Rydingsvard’s sculptures which are located in the Giardino della Marinaressa. Set in this small park, the mostly cedar works could have grown in the garden like a native species, so comfortable are they in the setting. In fact, the park was designed for the location – it had long been an abandoned and untended site. Besides the huge cedar-tree works, one with a carved lacy top where leaves might be – there is a shocking, other-worldy translucent-blue sculpture made of resin that has been cast in cedar. Islands of greener-than-real grass and light-tan cedar-chip walkways create a delightful consistency.L1170885 (Large) L1170884 (Large)

Biennale di Venezia, Italy till November 22, 2015

The Image of Motherhood, Parma

Michelangelo Pistoletto: Venere degli stracci, 1967,   Cittadellarte,  Fondazione Pistoletto  Biella.

Michelangelo Pistoletto: Venere degli stracci, 1967, Cittadellarte, Fondazione Pistoletto Biella.

A review by guest author Clare Ann Matz.

In this miracle of mater lies the mystery of life.

Palazzo del Governatore
Parma, Italy
Until June 28, 2015.

August Rodin: La Danaide, 1885.

August Rodin: La Danaide, 1885.

The exhibition aims to explore the sacred and archetypal aspect of motherhood and its fundamental role in the Mediterranean culture through a selection of archaeological and artistic masterpieces, from ancient Egypt to ancient Rome, from the fifteenth century (Filippo Lippi, Pinturicchio, Luca Signorelli) to the Renaissance (Bernardino Luini, Correggio, Andrea Mantegna, Paolo Veronese, Giambattista Tiepolo, Rosso Fiorentino), nineteenth (Francesco Hayez, Auguste Rodin) to the twentieth century (Alberto Giacometti, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Felice Casorati, Gino Severini), up to the contemporary (Lucio Fontana, Francesco Messina, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bill Viola).

Luca Signorelli: Annunciazione, 1491, Pinacoteca Civica  Volterra.

Luca Signorelli: Annunciazione, 1491, Pinacoteca Civica Volterra.

One hundred masterpieces from more than 70 museums and private Italian collections, on what the value of procreation and the responsibilities motherhood have represented and continue to represent in the life of every human being. The fascinating exhibition takes the visitor through the symbols of motherhood, in a territory where thought meets techniques, colours, designs, and where nothing should have limits.

Bill Viola: Emergence, 2002, Courtesy of the artist.

Bill Viola: Emergence, 2002, Courtesy of the artist.

The first breathtaking section draws the visitor into a milky coloured neutral space where feminine mysteries connected with the cult of Isis and Demeter are represented by the bust of Isis in basalt of the XXVI dynasty of the Egyptian Museum of Florence and the precious statue of Persephone (III. century BC) from the Civic Museum of Lucerne, stand silent looking out on the onlookers. Ancient depictions of the Great Mothers ’steatopygous‘ and the Greek-Roman theme of fertility and motherhood, which was considered for centuries the physical representation of the constant ratio of Humanity with the Divine. Among the most important works of this section one can see primitive female idols (Mother Goddess) such as the famous „Venus of Savignano (Mo)“ from the Ethnographic Museum Pigorini of Rome and the „Mother of murdered man Urzei“ from the Archaeological Museum Cagliari, as well as the Artemis Ephesia from the Vatican Museums.

Francesco Hayez:  Portrait of Teresa Zumali Marsili with son Giuseppe, 1833,  Museo Civico Lodi.

Francesco Hayez: Portrait of Teresa Zumali Marsili with son Giuseppe, 1833, Museo Civico Lodi.

The second section gives the symbolic turning point in the artistic representation of motherhood after the recognition of Mary as the Mother of God at the Council of Nicea in 325 AD.

Building on the artistic / religious experience of Byzantine icons the images go from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century Tuscan painters with precious masterpieces on canvas and famous “Madonna and Child” by Filippo Lippi to Andrea Mantegna, from Pinturicchio to Rosso Fiorentino. It is worth taking your time and sitting down to marvel at the incredible masterpieces painted by Veronese and by Tiepolo!

Dea Madre, IV BC, Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cagliari.

Dea Madre, IV BC, Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cagliari.

The thirds and fourth sections include the transformation of the family within the bourgeois century which has changed the ideal of sanctity of motherhood. The third section analyses the strong social imbalance created by the industrial revolution that would lead to the recovery of motherhood as a new value, here exemplified by the kind of portraits of Francesco Hayez and Domenico Induno.

Dea Iside, XXVI dinastia, Regno di Amasi Museo, Egizio, Firenze.

Dea Iside, XXVI dinastia, Regno di Amasi Museo, Egizio, Firenze.

And at last the emancipation of the female figure from archetypal themes with art of the twentieth century and the vanguards. What emerges is female a figure in competition with the newspapers and media, in which the woman, freed from the exclusive condition of mother, causes a change in the art of his own iconography. Sacred motherhood becomes seductive femininity and the sense of procreation gives way to a conceptual aesthetic representation. The modern artistic research of a new female archetype is seen through the works of Michelangelo Pistoletto, Max Kuatty, Bill Viola, and the famous Italian graphic icon, creator of the character of Valentina Crepax (which this year marks its 50. anniversary).

Salvador Dali's Space Venus, 1977.

Salvador Dali’s Space Venus, 1977.

It is a wonderful trip through the world of motherhood, but especially through womanhood. And it is an invaluable trip through time and space. The only true pity is that the curators Annamaria Andreoli, Elena Fontanella and Cosimo Damiano Fonseca didn’t include any women artists! It would have been interesting to see how women represent the female archetype.

Armani/Silos at Milan

L1170225 (Large)„I decided to call it Silos, because this building used to store food, which is, of course, essential for life. For me, just as much as food, clothes are a part of life.“

Giorgio ArmaniL1170223 (Large)40 years ago Giorgio Armani created a new fashion identity, defying the passing of time with subtle shades, smooth fabrics and deconstructed jackets. A thin line between masculine and feminine, between rigour and indulgence, where the secret of modern seduction is unveiled.L1170205 (Large) L1170211 (Large) L1170216 (Large)At the Armani/Silos the designer shows us a glimpse of his world: The dream of a measured, timeless aesthetic approach which has changed not only our way of dressing, but also and above all our way of thinking.L1170185 (Large) L1170179 (Large) L1170177 (Large) L1170175 (Large)L1170168 (Large)Built in 1950 for storing cereals, this large area of 4500 square meters divided over 4 floors, you can enjoy a selection of clothes from 1980 until today. The selection, which does not follow a chronological order, tells the story and shows the styles divided by themes. Themes which have inspired and continue to inspire the creative work of Giorgio Armani.

On the ground floor are the sections of Stars and Daywear. The first floor is dedicated to Exoticism. On the second floor there is a section called Coloration. The third and last floor is dedicated to Glamour.

L1170174 (Large) L1170170 (Large)Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, SundayL1170181 (Large)
11 am – 8 pm

Thursday, Saturday
11 am – 10 pm

Armani/Silos
Via Bergognone, 40
Milan, Italy

Carnival of Venice

Being one time in my life in another century. Could it be possible? Yes, in Venice. I came for Carnival and I stepped back in the past.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAIt is said that the Carnival of Venice started from a victory of the Serenissima Repubblica against the Patriarch of Aquileia, Ulrico di Treven, in the year 1094. In the honor of this victory, the people started to dance and make reunions in San Marco Square. Apparently, this festival started on that period and became official in the Renaissance. In the seventeenth century, the baroque carnival was a way to save the prestigious image of Venice in the world.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERAIt was very famous during the eighteenth century. It encouraged pleasure, but it was also used to protect Venetians against the anguish for present time and future. However, under the rule of the King of Austria, the festival was outlawed entirely in 1797 and the use of masks became strictly forbidden. It reappeared gradually in the nineteenth century, but only for short periods and above all for private feasts, where it became an occasion for artistic creations.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERABanned by Mussolini’s fascist party during the 1930’s, carnival was subsequently revived by a number of local artisans around 1979. Since then the annual Carnival of Venice has grown to become an internationally renowned event, celebrated by tourists and Venetians alike.

Of the many different types of events celebrated each year during the carnival the Gran Ballo della Cavalchina at the Teatro La Fenice is considered as the most spectacular and exclusive of all the Venetian masked balls.The modern Venetian Carnival culminates on the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday (known as Mardi Gras).

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