Giuseppe Ragazzini: An approach

_Guarda a sinistra!_, mixed media on paper, 2006, 27x35 cm (Large)

Exhibition:

GIUSEPPE RAGAZZINI: INCONTRI GROTTESCHI

MORI Gallery
29 November 2018 – 19 January 2019
Vicolo del Vescovado 5/A, Parma, Italy

_Bus_, 108,3x77 cm., 2009, Giuseppe Ragazzini (Large)

By guest author Clare Ann Matz

Painter, set designer, and visual artist Giuseppe Ragazzini was born in London in 1978.

After earning a degree in Philosophy, he became fascinated by the vision of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s documentary Le Mystère Picasso, and in 2002 he began using digital techniques to film the creative process of producing the pictorial image.

Dedicated to both painting and pictorial animation, Ragazzini has developed his own technique for pictorial animation and digital set design, which makes use of huge videoprojections and „mapping“.

Vanoni Servillo, _Le Canzoni della Mala_6 (Large)

In his work, the image becomes subject to an incessant transformation from the permanence of its preceding elements – a flux, a digital collage of elements continuously superimposing over themselves.

His set designs and projections have been displayed across Europe in theaters including Milan’s Piccolo Teatro Strehler and Venice’s Teatro La Fenice.  His animations have been featured in several of the main international animation festivals, including International Trickfilm Festival of Stuttgart, Anima Mundi, International Animation Festival of Brazil, Ottawa International Animation Festival (OIAF), International Festival of Erotic Animation (FIAE), Festival Internazionale at the Palazzo Venezia in Rome, and Visionaria International Festival.new york philharmonic-giuseppe ragazzini-dolce vita (Large)

In september 2014 he realized the video set design for the opening gala of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra at Lincoln Center. In July 2015 „La Dolce Vita, the music of Italian cinema“ was put on stage at the 58. Spoleto Festival. He has also produced videos and set designs for famous Italian musicians such as Avion Travel, Paolo Conte, Vinicio Capossela, Lucio Dalla, Gianna Nannini and Ornella Vanoni.

_Uomo con bambino_, (detail), 2014, mixed media on paper, 70x100 cm (Large)_uomo seduto su poltrona_, 2014 tecnica mista su carta, 70x100 (Large)From _The crumpled series_, 2016 (Large)

Ragazzini’s paintings and illustrations have been displayed in international exhibitions, collections, galleries, books, and periodicals, and he collaborates with the newspapers La Repubblica and Le Monde. Giuseppe Ragazzini is the son of the Italian photographer Enzo Ragazzini.

He lives and works in Milan.

ingranaggi facce (Large)

Clare Matz‘ Interview with the artist:

In which ways has the rich artistic heritage from Italy and Europe influenced your creative language?

My work, especially when I use the collage technique, is largely influenced above all by the Renaissance and Flemish painting. I like to think that this is partly due to my origins, half Italian and half Dutch. These inspirations and suggestions are declined in an imaginary that largely takes inspiration from the reality of our everyday life. Just think of my series „Mysterious Routine“, a series of characters sitting inside a modern bus, made using pieces of Renaissance paintings.

Who/What have been your mentors/teachers?

I am self-taught, which in part I think has saved me from the risks of the „academy“ and the risk of losing the signs and the language I was lucky enough to find myself naturally with since I was young. I am grateful, however, to my parents who were able to recognize and support this pre-disposition without forcing upon it.

My father Enzo in particular (an internationally renowned photographer) was and still is an artistic and moral model for me, a great teacher, an inspiration, as well as a friend and a travel companion from whom I have learned a lot about the shape, the sign and the freedom of artistic experimentation.

From the theatre to television and animation films to the printed page; from pop music, to classical music and more. How do you approach the projects in such different „ambients“? Is there a media you prefer working with? If so why?

My language tends continuously to contamination. The various „drifts“ I have undertaken over the years have all been natural evolutions of a journey begun with traditional painting. Initially I started using digital technologies to summarize the creative process in its development. A technique that I call „pictorial metamorphosis“ was born when my father showed me the documentary: The mystery of Picasso.

The pictorial animation arrived only later, when I felt the need to „animate“ my characters, my paintings and my collages. My pictorial animation and my video scenography is mostly my pictorial works and moving collages. There is no particular field I prefer, the only criterion is the freedom I enjoy in these situations. Obviously, the more I am free from various conditions, the happier I am and I think this always affects the result obtained.

What advantages have the new electronic technologies brought on for creative mutimedia artists like you?

My relationship with the digital world is very strong, although always starting from an analogical base. I believe that in many ways this is an unhappy era for contemporary art, where bluffs abound and often the excess or the end is found to be „an end for the sake of it“. However, I must admit that being born in the digital age was a great fortune for me: I was able to experiment with technologies that did not exist or had exorbitant costs until a few years ago. Just think of pictorial animation or collage or video projections. I believe that the fact of living in this time is the face of my art and my research in the digital and interactive media, a sort of small link between tradition and modernity.

l'acqua non è blu alta hd (Large)

You have created a marvellously interactive app named Mixerpiece. Why did you make it and how did you develop it?

Mixerpiece was born as a creative and educational application able to bring children closer to contemporary art. For years I had this project in mind and the opportunity came after a large permanent installation that I made in the waiting room of the Meyer Pediatric Hospital in Florence, where I also designed an app for hospital children. On that occasion I finally approached the world of teaching and applications and then I finally managed to realize my project.

However, Mixerpiece is not just a children’s app, but it is also a powerful creative tool for adults and even professionals: it is a sort of digital magnetic board with a series of elements, collected in categories, that can be combined to create new collages with infinite and very surprising creative possibilities. The peculiarity is that all these elements are extrapolated from famous masterpieces of art of all the centuries.

If you make ‚long tap‘ on an element you open a card that shows the work from which the piece has been extrapolated and some insights. Creatively speaking the most exciting feature is the ability to change your collage by shaking the iPad, which automatically creates new combinations of pieces starting from the outline of the first illustration created.

What are you presenting at the Mori Gallery in Parma, Italy?

There will be various works on exhibition, from my digital collages, drawings, ceramics to some works that I would call sculptural. The exhibition will end with the screening of my video The Kiss, a passionate kiss collage (made using 60 collages composed of pieces of work by great masters of the Renaissance), a metaphor for the ambiguity and mutability of Eros and human sexuality.

Giuseppe Ragazzini kiss frames copia (Large)

The project presented is an evolution of the theme of the grotesque and the newspaper, a theme dear to me. I like to talk, sometimes even in a rather brutal and disquieting way, of what surrounds us.

I believe it can be defined a work on identity and its grotesque manifestations, a changing identity consisting of endless fragments in constant change. I would like to thank Virginio Mori and Giorgia Ori (curator) for this opportunity to show my latest work.

What other projects are you currently working on?

I’m working on a video set design for a play by Lucia Poli directed by Angelo Bruno Savelli and I’m working on a pictorial video mapping project for a table.

At the same time I’m planning a „Pro“ edition of my ‚Mixerpiece‘ application and I am carrying  on  with my work as an illustrator, collaborating regularly with some newspapers including Le Monde.

Thank you.

L'Illusionista, Teatro dei Rinnovati, Siena (Large)

 

 

Advertisements

Capsula Mundi, Milan

A new approach to Death by guest author Clare Ann Matz.

Death … Leonardo da Vinci once said: „While I thought that I was learning how to live, I have been learning how to die.“

Every culture in the world has some concept of life after death. How are you preparing for your rite of passage?

I love you Grampa (Large)

The Capsula Mundi project wants to spur on a reflection on how our society deals with this important moment of life. There is no gloominess, no deprivation, no decay looking at death as a biological phenomenon: Our body keeps on producing elements through natural transformations, therefore it’s still living, feeding another life.

Capsula Mundi 4 (Large)

This project originates from a thought about the role of designers in our society, in the context of an international exhibition about innovation and avant-garde furniture design, the „Salone del Mobile“ in Milan; in 2003 Capsula Mundi was presented. Since then it has excited much interest from all over the world, with articles and interviews on the worldwide media, exhibitions and the support of so many people (more than 32.000 Likes on Facebook) .

It was created and presented by two designers: Anna Citelli and Raoul Bretzel who created the project to revise the ongoing burial practices and to change people’s approach to death, while respecting nature.

Capsula Mundi 2 (Large)

In 2015 they also presented Capsula Mundi on the stage of the „TEDx“ in Turin, Italy, and in September 2016 it was exhibited at the „Przemiany Festival“ in Poland, an annual event which combines art, science and philosophy with the aim of discussing how scientific and technological advances change our everyday lives and mould the future.

Capsula Mundi was presented in New Zealand as well, in occasion of the worldwide event „Italian Design Day“ in February 2017 and in April 2017 it was also shown at the 56th edition of the „Salone del Mobile“ in Milan, Italy, celebrating the success of the SaloneSatellite with an anthological exhibition.

containerstudio-capsulamundi-cartoline (Large)

Artwork curated by Containerstudio (www.containerstudio.it)

The project has two key points: The use of design to create an evocative and symbolic object which could change the approach to death, and the respect of nature. Capsula Mundi is an egg-shaped container, made of biodegradable material, where the ashes are placed or the remains are laid down in a foetal position. The ancient shape of the egg, the tree which connects earth and sky, the biological transformation of natural substances are all symbols of life, non-religious and universal.

Capsula Mundi Urn_tree 3 (Large)

The pod is buried as a seed in the earth. A tree, chosen in life by the deceased, is planted on top of it, as a legacy for the posterity and the future of our planet. Family and friends look after it. The aim is to have forests instead of gravestones cemeteries.

Schwarzwald_Berlin www.danielbelet.ch (Large)

Landes_PereLachaise www.danielbelet.ch (Large)

Photo copyrights: Daniel Belet (www.danielbelet.ch)

The cemetery will take on a new look, no more dark stones but living trees in a holy forest. The trees will be mapped with the GPS system, so people will be able to find the tree of the beloved. Green burials are the future: It would change our approach to death and give a contribution to save the planet.

containerstudio-capsulamundi-brochure (Large)

Brochure curated by Containerstudio (www.containerstudio.it)

More information on the project:

www.capsulamundi.it

infocapsulamundi@capsulamundi.it

 

 

 

 

 

Clare Ann Matz goes Video

“I have  always explored the relationship between music, the spoken word and video art with collaborations between poets and musicians and filmmakers. Having worked on various multimedia productions I have acquired a sensitivity towards the alchemy of combining these elements: the volumes and textures, the colours and forms. The rhythm and of course meaning of the lyrics all contribute in creating a message which reaches the viewer/listener on different levels and touches their unconscious world.”

Clare Ann Matz about her art.

clare profile with name

I met Clare some years ago in Thailand. I was impressed by her creativity and her way of life. She wrote an article on sl4artglobal. You find it here. Now she goes into video production and I was stunned to learn about her newest projects, which will be described in the following text.

Clare Ann Matz is a journalist, writer, performance artist, musician, painter and film director.  Born in New York City she has travelled the world extensively. She  has lived and worked in Italy since the early 1980s.

portrait clare tim tour 2002 (Large)

She won the 1° prize “Città di Commacchio” at the Palazzo dei Diamanti of Ferrara with „Energy“ (1984). In 1987 she worked in New York City with the Japanese Butoh group Poppo and later that year she was a performance artist at the  Festival Kassel Documenta 8 with Italian dance/theatre group Kripton.

Clare hosted television shows for VideoMusic Italy and SuperChanel London from 1989 to 1995 and directed from 2000 to 2002 the TV show “Bande Sonore”  for Italia 1.
She performed at the Biennale in Venice in 1999 with the Progetto Oreste and again in 2006 with the Retrò project presenting „Le Città invisibili“ by Italo Calvino.

Currently she collaborates with The CAM Art Co. in New York City and poets and artists in Italy.

Recently, having studied music at the Venice conservatory of Music as a child and using modern electronic programs, she has composed a number of songs and wants to experiment with the extraordinary world of „Alice in Wonderland“ by Lewis Carroll. Jabberwocky is the first of this series of video/poems she is now working on.

Frontiere1

It is based on Lewis Carroll’s „Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There“ (1872). She sang it backwards as if reading it through a mirror and enjoyed the freedom that using sounds rather than words.

The animated graphic designs are made by artist Adam Pizurny. „Our collaboration was possible thanks to the internet, which offers exceptional information and opportunities. The possibility of exchanging files rapidly and elaborating them on line is a whole new experience in comparison with the pioneering days when all technical equipment was big and bulky and the results were often rough and unpolished“, states Clare.

If you or any other artist would like to collaborate with Clare for the next videos, please feel free to contact her.

www.clareannmatz.com

 

 

Patti Smith: Higher Learning, Parma

Patti Smith, Slippers of Pope Benedict XV, New York City, 2007, 10 X 8 in (25.4 X 20.3 cm) (Large)

Patti Smith, Slippers of Pope Benedict XV, New York City, 2007.

A review by guest author Clare Ann Matz.

 PATTI SMITH „Higher Learning“

120 photographs by Patti Smith and THE NY SCENE „Art, culture and the new avant-garde movement in the 70s – 80s“
150 works of art by Galella, Ginsberg, Gorgoni, Makos, Warhol …

Palazzo del Governatore
Parma, Italy
Until July 16, 2017.

Patti Smith, Auto Portrait 2, 2003, 10 X 8 in (25.4 X 20.3 cm) (Large)

Patti Smith, Auto Portrait 2, 2003.

Higher Learning is a meditative journey on creativity and the passage of time, presenting 120 black and white Polaroid photographs taken by Patti Smith during her travels around the world, its title comes from the record Land, published in 2002.

Gianfranco Gorgoni, Jean Michael Basquiat, NYC, 1983, Lambda print mounted on aluminum, 180x130cm, -®Gianfranco Gorgoni _ Courtesy Photology.jpeg

Gianfranco Gorgoni, Jean Michael Basquiat, NYC, 1983, Lambda print mounted on aluminum, 180x130cm, ©Gianfranco Gorgoni _ Courtesy Photology.

The exhibition, organized by the University of Parma, the City of Parma and produced by International Music and Arts, celebrates the work of Patti Smith in occasion of  the honorary doctorate in classic and modern literature awarded her by the University of Parma on May 3rd, 2017.

The small photographs, taken with a vintage Land 250 Polaroid camera, are a visual diary showing the locations, the furniture, the statues, tombstones, and other objects which belonged to artists who contributed in developing Patti Smith’s cultural heritage, including Herman Hesse’s typewriter, Frida Kahlo’s bed, corset, crutches and medicine bottles, Paul Verlaine’s revolver, Margot Fonteyn’s ballet slippers and other relics.

Printed with gelatin silver process in limited 10 copy editions the photos defy the modern concept of digital photography, most images are out of focus and badly exposed, as if on a nostalgic quest, a longing for artistic masters and mementos from the past.

Patti Smith, Hermann Hesses's typewriter, Lugano, Switzerland, 2003, Gelatin silver print, edition of 10, 14 X 11 in (35.6 X 27.9 cm)

Patti Smith, Hermann Hesses’s typewriter, Lugano, Switzerland, 2003.

A yearning which has been at the heart of Patti Smith’s visual work from the very beginning, and whose embryo can be found in the book Babel published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in New York in 1974.

Patti Smith, Pier Paolo Pasolini's grave, Giulia, Italy, 2015, Gelatin silver print, edition of 10, 8 X 10 in (20.3 X 25.4 cm)

Patti Smith, Pier Paolo Pasolini’s grave, Giulia, Italy, 2015.

Speaking about the honor of receiving a Laurea honoris causa Patti Smith comments:

„When I was young I dreamed of going to a big university. It is an honor to receive  the  Laurea honoris causa from Parma University, one of the oldest and most prestigious universities of Europe. I have always believed in the importance of education, and receiving this award from this eminent institution for higher education both embarrasses and stimulates me. This exhibition is a homage to another form of education. The university of life, of travelling, of books, artists, poets and teachers.

The images are visual representations of the pilgrimages and of gratitude, an ongoing love and respect for our cultural voices, for their great works and the humility of their instruments. A brush, a typewriter, the beds on which they dreamed. The places of their eternal peace.“

Patti Smith, gods hand rome, 2007, gelatin silver print, 20.32 X 25.4 cm

Patti Smith, God’s hand, Rome, 2007.

Gianfranco Gorgoni, Keith Haring in Front of Queens Bridge_, NYC, 1985, Vintage Gelatin Silver Print, 35,6x28cm, -®Gianfranco Gorgoni _ Courtesy Photology

Gianfranco Gorgoni, Keith Haring in Front of Queens Bridge, New York City, 1985.

The THE NY SCENE „Art, culture and the new avant-garde movement in the 70s – 80s“, produced by Photology in collaboration with the City of Parma, exhibits 150 images linked to the artistic environment which developed in New York City between the 70s and the 80s, when the city became the world capital of contemporary art and launched the Pop Art  movement and the Beat Generation.

The photographs exhibited illustrate a cauldron of art, sex, drugs, pop culture and literary avant-garde through the eyes of the artists that contributed in the creation of these movements: Galella, Ginsberg, Goldin, Gorgoni, Makos, Mapplethorpe and Warhol and others.

Christopher Makos, Altered Image-Portrait of Andy Warhol, NYC, 1981_82, 50x40cm, Installation of 9 digital pigment print, -®Christopher Makos _ Courtesy Photology

Christopher Makos, Altered Image-Portrait of Andy Warhol, NYC, 1981_82, 50x40cm, Installation of 9 digital pigment print, ©Christopher Makos _ Courtesy Photology.

However the alembic container of the Palazzo del Governatore purges them of the nitty-gritty, grubby, noisy reality of the Big Apple, distilling an essence of refined photographs, carefully enclosed in sober frames, which defy the very purpose of the exhibition, which is to illustrate the energy in the Big Apple in the 70s and 80s.

photology 102

Ron Galella, Mick Jagger, NYC, 08_09_1983, Vintage Gelatin Silver Print, 25,2×16,3cm, ©Ron Galella _Courtesy Photology.

The exhibition is divided in two sections „The East Side“ with Allen Ginsberg’s „Beat+Pieces“ portraying the poets of the Beat Generation with refined gelatin silver prints, including John Giorno, Gregory Corso, Julius Orlovsky and other interesting players of the scene such as Annie Leibovitz, John Cage and Judith Malina.

Allen Ginsberg, Francesco Clemente, Greenwich Village, N.Y.C., June 1992, Gelatin Silver Print, 30x40cm, -®Allen Ginsberg Estate, New York_ Courtesy Photology.jpg (Large)

Allen Ginsberg, Francesco Clemente, Greenwich Village, N.Y.C., June 1992, Gelatin Silver Print, 30x40cm, ©Allen Ginsberg Estate, New York_ Courtesy Photology.

Gianfranco Gorgoni who focuses more on visual artists with both b/w as well as striking, large Lambda color prints depicting Richard Serra, Francesco Clemente, Claes Oldenburg, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol and Keith Haring.

Nan Goldin’s Cibacrome „Everyday“ photographs recall the more familiar atmospheres of those years.

There are also two films: A documentary by Gianfranco Gorgoni about the owner of renowned art gallery Leo Castelli and the work of Swiss filmmaker Albert Schepflin shot in Sandy Daley’s room at the Chelsea Hotel with a soundtrack by Patti Smith chanting the poem „Thief“.

Patti Smith, Winged Cherubim, San Severino Marche, 2009, 14 X 11 in (35.6 X 27.9 cm) (Large)

Patti Smith, Winged Cherubim, San Severino, Marche, 2009.

The second section „The West Side“ begins with Andy Warhol’s „Instant Polaroids“ of artists and the jet set which gravitated around each other including Jane Fonda, Ryan and Tatum O’Neal, John McEnroe, Joan Collins, John Denver and artists Jasper Jones and Roy Lichtenstein. „Altered Images“  by Christopher Makos is a series of stark portraits of Andy Warhol in normal clothes, but heavy facial make up. „Not a drag act but 8 wigs, 2 days and 349 shots“, as Makos recalls, to capture the king of Pop Art in his multiple facets. At last Ron Galella’s „Disco years“ are just that, Polaroid pictures of celebrities at the Studio 54.

Patti Smith, Gabriele D'Annunzio's bed, Brescia, 2015, Gelatin silver print, edition of 10, 10 X 8 in (25.4 X 20.3 cm)

Patti Smith, Gabriele D’Annunzio’s bed, Brescia, 2015.

A small room with just one large photograph of a skull is dedicated to Robert Mapplethorpe yet one can spend a good hour there (they have placed comfortable benches) watching a clever 2016 HBO documentary film by Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey. „Look at the pictures“ depicts the extra-ordinary life of the controversial photographer through interviews with friends, school mates, colleagues, clients and gallery owners, plus historic footage, drawings made as a child, multimedia experiments at Pratt Institute and of course many exceptional photographs. Especially touching is the extensive interview with Robert Mapplethorpe’s brother Edward and the trial during which the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center was charged of obscenity twenty-five years ago.

Patti Smith, Michelangelo, David, Florence, 2007, Stampa su gelatina al bronuro d'argento, 35.56 X 27.94 cm (Large)

Patti Smith, Michelangelo, David, Florence, 2007.

As one exits the gallery a final room houses the double screening of Andy Warhol’s 1967 film „Chelsea Girls“, maybe an interesting experiment for the time, but quite insignificant after the overwhelming experience of a full immersion in Robert Mapplethorpe’s world.

Patti Smith, Columns (Gabriele D'Annunzio's garden), 2003, Gelatin silver print, edition of 10, 10 X 8 in (25.4 X 20.3 cm) (Large)

Patti Smith, Columns (Gabriele D’Annunzio’s garden), 2003.

 

 

The Image of Motherhood, Parma

Michelangelo Pistoletto: Venere degli stracci, 1967,   Cittadellarte,  Fondazione Pistoletto  Biella.

Michelangelo Pistoletto: Venere degli stracci, 1967, Cittadellarte, Fondazione Pistoletto Biella.

A review by guest author Clare Ann Matz.

In this miracle of mater lies the mystery of life.

Palazzo del Governatore
Parma, Italy
Until June 28, 2015.

August Rodin: La Danaide, 1885.

August Rodin: La Danaide, 1885.

The exhibition aims to explore the sacred and archetypal aspect of motherhood and its fundamental role in the Mediterranean culture through a selection of archaeological and artistic masterpieces, from ancient Egypt to ancient Rome, from the fifteenth century (Filippo Lippi, Pinturicchio, Luca Signorelli) to the Renaissance (Bernardino Luini, Correggio, Andrea Mantegna, Paolo Veronese, Giambattista Tiepolo, Rosso Fiorentino), nineteenth (Francesco Hayez, Auguste Rodin) to the twentieth century (Alberto Giacometti, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Felice Casorati, Gino Severini), up to the contemporary (Lucio Fontana, Francesco Messina, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Bill Viola).

Luca Signorelli: Annunciazione, 1491, Pinacoteca Civica  Volterra.

Luca Signorelli: Annunciazione, 1491, Pinacoteca Civica Volterra.

One hundred masterpieces from more than 70 museums and private Italian collections, on what the value of procreation and the responsibilities motherhood have represented and continue to represent in the life of every human being. The fascinating exhibition takes the visitor through the symbols of motherhood, in a territory where thought meets techniques, colours, designs, and where nothing should have limits.

Bill Viola: Emergence, 2002, Courtesy of the artist.

Bill Viola: Emergence, 2002, Courtesy of the artist.

The first breathtaking section draws the visitor into a milky coloured neutral space where feminine mysteries connected with the cult of Isis and Demeter are represented by the bust of Isis in basalt of the XXVI dynasty of the Egyptian Museum of Florence and the precious statue of Persephone (III. century BC) from the Civic Museum of Lucerne, stand silent looking out on the onlookers. Ancient depictions of the Great Mothers ’steatopygous‘ and the Greek-Roman theme of fertility and motherhood, which was considered for centuries the physical representation of the constant ratio of Humanity with the Divine. Among the most important works of this section one can see primitive female idols (Mother Goddess) such as the famous „Venus of Savignano (Mo)“ from the Ethnographic Museum Pigorini of Rome and the „Mother of murdered man Urzei“ from the Archaeological Museum Cagliari, as well as the Artemis Ephesia from the Vatican Museums.

Francesco Hayez:  Portrait of Teresa Zumali Marsili with son Giuseppe, 1833,  Museo Civico Lodi.

Francesco Hayez: Portrait of Teresa Zumali Marsili with son Giuseppe, 1833, Museo Civico Lodi.

The second section gives the symbolic turning point in the artistic representation of motherhood after the recognition of Mary as the Mother of God at the Council of Nicea in 325 AD.

Building on the artistic / religious experience of Byzantine icons the images go from the fourteenth to the seventeenth century Tuscan painters with precious masterpieces on canvas and famous “Madonna and Child” by Filippo Lippi to Andrea Mantegna, from Pinturicchio to Rosso Fiorentino. It is worth taking your time and sitting down to marvel at the incredible masterpieces painted by Veronese and by Tiepolo!

Dea Madre, IV BC, Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cagliari.

Dea Madre, IV BC, Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Cagliari.

The thirds and fourth sections include the transformation of the family within the bourgeois century which has changed the ideal of sanctity of motherhood. The third section analyses the strong social imbalance created by the industrial revolution that would lead to the recovery of motherhood as a new value, here exemplified by the kind of portraits of Francesco Hayez and Domenico Induno.

Dea Iside, XXVI dinastia, Regno di Amasi Museo, Egizio, Firenze.

Dea Iside, XXVI dinastia, Regno di Amasi Museo, Egizio, Firenze.

And at last the emancipation of the female figure from archetypal themes with art of the twentieth century and the vanguards. What emerges is female a figure in competition with the newspapers and media, in which the woman, freed from the exclusive condition of mother, causes a change in the art of his own iconography. Sacred motherhood becomes seductive femininity and the sense of procreation gives way to a conceptual aesthetic representation. The modern artistic research of a new female archetype is seen through the works of Michelangelo Pistoletto, Max Kuatty, Bill Viola, and the famous Italian graphic icon, creator of the character of Valentina Crepax (which this year marks its 50. anniversary).

Salvador Dali's Space Venus, 1977.

Salvador Dali’s Space Venus, 1977.

It is a wonderful trip through the world of motherhood, but especially through womanhood. And it is an invaluable trip through time and space. The only true pity is that the curators Annamaria Andreoli, Elena Fontanella and Cosimo Damiano Fonseca didn’t include any women artists! It would have been interesting to see how women represent the female archetype.